dcsimg
Find Local Contractor Call: 844-251-6308
No Obligation, Free Quotes
Home > Home Wiring USA Archive: NEC 1999 > Short Articles >

Seven Steps to Installing and Finishing Drywall

By Karin Mangan
Seven Steps to Installing and Finishing Drywall

Perhaps you have just finished framing and wiring a room addition, or maybe you had water damage and had to remove damaged drywall. Now you have to cover up those bare studs with drywall (also called sheet rock), so that the room is usable. Here's how to do it.

  • Measure walls and ceiling and calculate how many sheets of drywall you will need. Remember, you will probably need to cut some sheets, especially if you have ceilings that are higher than eight feet. Purchase 1/2 inch or 5/8 inch drywall (in 8', 10', or 12' sheets, depending on ceiling height), tape, joint compound, and adhesive at your local home improvement store.
  • Gather all your tools. You will need a T-square, a long straightedge, a utility knife, a drywall knife, a trowel, a keyhole saw, and either drywall nails and a hammer or drywall screws and an electric drill with a Philips screwdriver bit. Drywall screws are recommended.
  • Start installing the drywall in the ceiling first, then the walls. Start in one corner. Run a bead of adhesive down the studs to be covered, place the drywall, and then fasten it to the studs with screws or nails. Make sure the edge covers half the width of a stud. You'll need the other half to fasten the next sheet. It's also a good idea to mark the drywall so you will hit studs when fastening the middle part of the sheet. Mark and cut holes for electrical outlets, light fixtures, and switches. Install whole sheets first, then cut sheets to fit the remaining uncovered wall portions.
  • Tape all joints between sheets using drywall tape and drywall compound (also called "mud"). Use a wide drywall knife to apply the mud over the tape. Be sure that tape is completely covered with the compound. Allow to dry overnight.
  • Apply texture to the sheet rock. Texture can be either sprayed or troweled on. It takes a bit of finesse to "skip trowel" to get a nice texture if you are using the trowel method. Start in an inconspicuous place until you have the knack. Allow to dry for at least twenty-four hours, preferably forty-eight hours.
  • Now it's time to paint. Start with a primer coat, applied with a roller. When the primer is dry, paint the finish coat in the desired color using a high quality interior latex paint.
  • Install baseboards around the bottom of the walls, and crown moulding at the top if desired. Install cover plates over electrical outlets and switches.

Voila! Your room is now ready for use.

Find a Pre-Screened Electrician
Enter Your Zip Code:


THIS ARTICLE IS PROVIDED 'AS IS' WITH NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. THE AUTHOR, THE SITE OWNER AND ITS AFFILIATES ASSUME NO LIABILITY FOR ERRORS OR OMISSIONS CONTAINED THEREIN OR FOR ANY USE OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT. The article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice.